Untitled

Apr 30

Diplomacy is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they actually look forward to the trip.

Apr 29

lickystickypickywe:

Part 2 in the Willemstad, Curaçao series.

A stroll in the historic part of this city is so colorful it looks like a rainbow exploded over it.
There’s a distinct Dutch colonial style in the architecture, but the colors and certain ornamental shapes also show its Spanish heritage and influences by others that briefly took hold of the island.
There’s extensive documentation on the city’s architecture as it is on the World Heritage List.

The capital city developed after the Dutch claimed the island in 1634, beginning with Punda, the walled portion of the old city. Buildings tended to be two and three-story shops and residences built on narrow, elongated lots to maximize use of scarce land. The only materials available for construction, mismatched bricks scavenged from ship ballast, were finished with lime plaster made from crushed shells, which dried to a dazzling white facade in the intense Caribbean sun..

It is said that a former governor of the island who suffered from severe headaches, believing his malady was aggravated by the sun’s brilliant reflections off the white buildings, mandated that building exteriors be painted any color but white. Despite later discovery that the governor was a shareholder in the island’s only paint store, the tradition of painting in vivid colors has endured, making Willemstad’s Dutch and Spanish colonial style architecture one of the most stunning sights in the Caribbean. 

Apr 28
thiscitycalledearth:

by Catherine K Chen, Paris.
Apr 28
dajavuphoto:

Cloudless skies and a moderate aurora forecast prompted me out to the lake in the wee hours of Tuesday morning. While the lack of any visible light-show was disappointing, the low lying fog contributed to an okay shot or two at least. And the surprise afterward was a slight auroral arc in a couple of frames after all! Other than sleeping, I couldn’t think of anything better to be doing between 1 and 3am, and was glad I went out.
This is the boat dock at the still-frozen-over Charlie Lake, British Columbia, with illumination from a lone streetlamp in the parking area over my left shoulder, which also contributed the fogbow I believe.
 
 
 
 
 
 

dajavuphoto:

Cloudless skies and a moderate aurora forecast prompted me out to the lake in the wee hours of Tuesday morning. While the lack of any visible light-show was disappointing, the low lying fog contributed to an okay shot or two at least. And the surprise afterward was a slight auroral arc in a couple of frames after all! Other than sleeping, I couldn’t think of anything better to be doing between 1 and 3am, and was glad I went out.

This is the boat dock at the still-frozen-over Charlie Lake, British Columbia, with illumination from a lone streetlamp in the parking area over my left shoulder, which also contributed the fogbow I believe.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Apr 28

latenightjimmy:

“Sexy and I Know It”

YES! (Watch it here!)

Apr 28

quote I used to be able to name every nut that there was. And it used to drive my mother crazy, because she used to say, “Harlan Pepper, if you don’t stop naming nuts,” and the joke was that we lived in Pine Nut, and I think that’s what put it in my mind at that point. So she would hear me in the other room, and she’d just start yelling. I’d say, “Peanut. Hazelnut. Cashew nut. Macadamia nut.” That was the one that would send her into going crazy. She’d say, “Would you stop naming nuts!” And Hubert used to be able to make the sound, he couldn’t talk, but he’d go “rrrawr rrawr” and that sounded like Macadamia nut. Pine nut, which is a nut, but it’s also the name of a town. Pistachio nut. Red pistachio nut. Natural, all natural white pistachio nut.

— Harlan Pepper, Best in Show (via comedynerdsunited)
Apr 28
lickystickypickywe:

Yup, I live in paradise.

lickystickypickywe:

Yup, I live in paradise.

Apr 28
lickystickypickywe:

REPRODUCTIVE TRICKS OF THE “LESBIAN LIZARDS”

As if being able to re-grow a tail isn’t cool enough, some species of whiptail lizards (genus Cnemidophorus) have another trick: They can clone themselves. These species actually consist completely of females able to reproduce by parthenogenesis.
The original sexless females, known as parthenogens, come from the hybridization of two separate lizard lines. The parthenogen has one copy of chromosomes from its mother, and one analogous but slightly different copy from its father. It can give rise to offspring that are their exact clones, without their two genetic copies recombining.
Asexual whiptails have a special trick for making spermless reproduction work: The egg cells in other animals first double their choromosomes once and then divide twice, leaving them as haploid cells, with half the normal number of genetic material. But the whiptails’ egg cells first double their chromosomes twice and then divide twice, leaving them with the normal number of chromosomes and rendering a sperm cell unnecessary.
Pairs of female whiptails sometimes engage in mock sex, which led to the nickname “lesbian lizards” and seems to encourage the production of egg cells. But they do seem to have some interest in the opposite gender: Sometimes these parthenogens are mate with males of different species, creating a species with 50 percent more genes than normal.

The animal kingdom upstaged humans this time……..

lickystickypickywe:

REPRODUCTIVE TRICKS OF THE “LESBIAN LIZARDS”

As if being able to re-grow a tail isn’t cool enough, some species of whiptail lizards (genus Cnemidophorus) have another trick: They can clone themselves. These species actually consist completely of females able to reproduce by parthenogenesis.

The original sexless females, known as parthenogens, come from the hybridization of two separate lizard lines. The parthenogen has one copy of chromosomes from its mother, and one analogous but slightly different copy from its father. It can give rise to offspring that are their exact clones, without their two genetic copies recombining.

Asexual whiptails have a special trick for making spermless reproduction work: The egg cells in other animals first double their choromosomes once and then divide twice, leaving them as haploid cells, with half the normal number of genetic material. But the whiptails’ egg cells first double their chromosomes twice and then divide twice, leaving them with the normal number of chromosomes and rendering a sperm cell unnecessary.

Pairs of female whiptails sometimes engage in mock sex, which led to the nickname “lesbian lizards” and seems to encourage the production of egg cells. But they do seem to have some interest in the opposite gender: Sometimes these parthenogens are mate with males of different species, creating a species with 50 percent more genes than normal.

The animal kingdom upstaged humans this time……..

Apr 28

latenightjimmy:

comedynerdsunited:

Fred Armisen as a lady always tickles my funny bone. 

Us too!

Apr 28
lickystickypickywe:

There’s one cloud and a half. It’s in transit.
To Boston, MA.

lickystickypickywe:

There’s one cloud and a half. It’s in transit.

To Boston, MA.